Protect Voters’ Right Investigated

Group that funded DiCiccio recall attempt investigated

“The fact that PVR formed at or around the same time as Save Phoenix Taxpayers and was the largest contributor to the political committee does not mean PVR is a sham entity or that it violated the law,” Desai wrote in a letter to the Secretary of State.

No, but it is highly suspicious if it is also true that all but about $100 dollars of Save Phoenix Taxpayers DiCiccio recall campaign was funded by Scott Phelps’ Protect Voters’ Rights (PVR) organization. That sounds sounds worthy of investigating given the Supreme Court of the United States’ questionable ruling:

Groups like Protect Voters’ Rights have become more prevalent after the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling in Citizens United vs. Federal Election Commission. The court ruled that corporations and unions could spend unlimited amounts of money to influence elections as long as they don’t coordinate with a campaign or give directly to a candidate.

The question, and investigation, is over whether PVR illegally coordinated a political campaign effort by created a sham company. All groups such as these, regardless of political stripe, should be investigated and if found to be violating the law prosecuted and punished so that elections don’t become any more corrupt than  they have already have thanks to the SCOTUS’s poor decision.

As to Save Phoenix Taxpayers, I figured the group was a sham anyway. I was approached three separate times to support the recall effort. In each instance when I asked them to give me legitimate, non-politically motivated reasons (i.e. illegal activity, failure to perform the duties of their office, etc.) to have DiCiccio recalled none could do so. The worst was the third individual who claimed he was only collecting signatures for a paycheck and had no interest in the recall effort what so ever. Not exactly a ringing endorsement for the organization there.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s